An interdisciplinary journal about regions, places, and cultures of the US South and their global connections
  • resep kue kering
  • resep kue
  • recept
  • resep sambal goreng kentang
  • resep kue sus
  • resep ayam
  • resep soto ayam
  • resep ikan bakar
  • pecel lele
  • resep kue kering lebaran
  • resep nastar
  • resep nasi goreng
  • resep ayam goreng
  • resep ayam bakar
  • kue ulang tahun
  • resep pancake
  • resep bolu kukus
  • liga inggris
  • anjing dijual
  • recipe
  • Posted on April 14, 2015

    Atlanta Intersections features Atlantans in conversation with Randy Gue, curator of Modern Political and Historical Collections at Emory University's Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL). In collaboration with Southern Spaces, MARBL presents clips of the full interviews to spur conversations and encourage research on the featured topics.

    "Sense of Awakening," Topophilia, 2013. Photograph by Stephanie Dowda. Courtesy of Stephanie Dowda.
    "Sense of Awakening," Topophilia, 2013. Photograph by Stephanie Dowda. Courtesy of Stephanie Dowda.

    Atlanta-based photographer Stephanie Dowda is a studio artist with the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center and also maintains a darkroom at the Goat Farm Arts Center. A Georgia State University graduate, Dowda frequently presents throughout the Atlanta metro area. Dowda's work has appeared in Oxford American, Bad at Sports, ArtsATL, BURNAWAY, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and the Atlanta Magazine. She has exhibited in numerous galleries, including Get This Gallery, M Rich Gallery, Beep Beep Gallery, Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Kibbee Gallery, and the Atlanta Preservation Center.

    In this clip, Dowda discusses her life-altering encounter with The Lightning Field in New Mexico, an installation piece by renowned sculptor, Walter De Maria. Dowda describes the piece as a quarter-mile long desert field installed with nearly 400 steel poles that extend into the sky:

    The idea is that you go there and hang out in a cabin for a night and then play around in the lightening field . . . It was completely life changing . . . There is just something about that [experience] that changed me, and it also changed my camera.

    "Sense of Deafening Silence," Topophilia, 2013. Photograph by Stephanie Dowda. Courtesy of Stephanie Dowda.
    "Sense of Revenant," Topophilia, 2013. Photograph by Stephanie Dowda. Courtesy of Stephanie Dowda.

    Dowda recalls that, after spending the night in the lightning field, she discovered that the photos taken there had been altered. Searching for a technical explanation as to why her photos developed in this particular way, Dowda found no easy answers. Moreover, after this experience, Dowda describes that her camera continued to yield images seemingly "possessed" by the energy from the lightning field. Inspired by this experience, Dowda works to develop new and innovative ways of illuminating the energy that differentiate locations from one another. In this clip, she elaborates on her interpretation of topophilia, a concept cultural geographer Yi-Fu Tuan coined to articulate the strong sense of place that can yield a personal attachment to particular landscapes.

     
    Randy Gue interviews Stephanie Dowda.
    Posted on April 7, 2015
    by

    Maureen McGavin, Emory University

    in

     

    Atlanta Studies website, 2015. Screenshot of Boyd Lewis's photo of Margaret Mitchell's apartment house. Courtesy of Emory News. The website includes Boyd Lewis's original article about living in Margaret Mitchell's apartment and the building's history, an example of the original scholarship encouraged by the collaborative publication.
    Atlanta Studies website, 2015. Screenshot of Boyd Lewis's photo of Margaret Mitchell's apartment house. Courtesy of Emory News. The website includes Boyd Lewis's original article about living in Margaret Mitchell's apartment and the building's history, an example of the original scholarship encouraged by the collaborative publication.

    Emory University's Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS) is hosting a new website to bring together research projects, resources, and information about the Atlanta metro region and inspire new scholarship.

    Atlanta Studies (www.AtlantaStudies.org), which launched Feb. 16, is an open-access online publication that features original writings and projects about the Atlanta region, resources for the region, and events such as quarterly meetups and an annual Atlanta Studies Symposium. Atlanta Studies is a collaborative effort, with editorial and advisory board members from organizations and institutions across the region and the country, and aims to engage audiences both inside and outside the academic world.

    "The Atlanta metro region is large, growing rapidly, and under-studied," says Allen Tullos, co-director of ECDS. "The Atlanta Studies project offers a unique site where shared research and discussion about the region's past, present, and future can take place among collaborating institutions and organizations."

    Atlanta Studies is not just for those in the academic arena, but for members of the public as well, says editorial board member Ed Hatfield, an ECDS graduate fellow in digital humanities and PhD candidate in history at Emory.

    "We want to bring academic scholarship to the public at large and to make a contribution to Atlanta's media landscape, so people who are interested in history and politics can have a new source for commentary, analysis and information," Hatfield says.

    Features of the Atlanta Studies Site

    Atlanta Studies website, 2015. Screenshot of the projects and resources available to members of the public as well as academics. Courtesy of Emory News. The section is expected to expand as the new website takes off.
    Atlanta Studies website, 2015. Screenshot of the projects and resources available to members of the public as well as academics. Courtesy of Emory News. The section is expected to expand as the new website takes off.

    The website publishes original scholarship on a monthly basis; the first article is Boyd Lewis' "Living at Peggy's: Where Margaret Mitchell Wrote ‘Gone with the Wind,'" an insightful telling of the history of Mitchell's famous apartment, including a first-person account of the period when Lewis occupied it.

    Blog posts such as Scott Libson's "The Lost Picture Show: Remapping the Cinema Landscape of Segregated Atlanta" – about the work of Emory professors Dana White (emeritus) and Matthew Bernstein using ECDS's forthcoming Digital Atlanta Geocoder mapping system – will appear on a regular basis, Hatfield says.

    "We're always looking for new and interesting voices, and we're really excited about what we're starting out with," says Sarah Melton, ECDS digital projects coordinator and a PhD candidate studying public history at Emory University. Submissions are accepted via email at AtlStudies@gmail.com and reviewed by the editorial board.

    AtlantaStudies.org also offers a gateway to several projects and resources. Current featured projects are the ECDS's Battle of Atlanta smartphone-accessible tour; the Peoplestown Project about the historic neighborhood and its community-based organizing legacy; and the Inman Park Squirrel Census, with findings and often humorous stories from its "census" of the Eastern gray squirrel in an urban neighborhood.

    Resources include access to historic Atlanta topographic maps, as well as to multiple Atlanta maps related to demographics, regional planning, economic development, education, public health, housing, and transportation.

    How it Began

    The online publication is an outgrowth of the Atlanta Studies Network, a group formed in 2012 by former ECDS digital scholarship coordinator Stewart Varner and Brennan Collins, associate director of Writing across the Curriculum and the Center for Instructional Innovation at Georgia State University. The group's purpose: to bring together people engaged in their own research projects about Atlanta. Group members' projects often pertain to community development, socio-economic issues, transportation and infrastructure, urban design, and labor and unemployment.

    "When Atlanta Studies Network began, there was a lack of a space for people to find resources and research about the Atlanta, which really surprised us because Atlanta is a huge metro area," Melton says. "We wanted to create a space where people could find high-quality, interesting, original scholarship about the region, as well as resources for people who wanted to do their own projects and research."

    Group members now number about 200, and the casual quarterly meetings are attended by a mix of academics and members of the public. The first annual Atlanta Studies Symposium was held at Emory University in spring 2013 and drew about 125 people; the second was held at Georgia State, and this year's symposium will take place at Georgia Institute of Technology on May 6.

    "The growth and the collaboration are a credit to the leadership Emory has shown in building a digital scholarship center and promoting digital humanities," Hatfield says. "All of our colleagues in our partner institutions are supportive and in many cases doing equally impressive work in the field."

    A Joint Project with Other Universities and Organizations

    AtlantaStudies.org is guided by an editorial board and an advisory board, both of which reflect the cooperative nature of Atlanta Studies itself. The two boards include people from inside and outside academia.

    The editorial board includes people from Emory, Georgia State, and Kennesaw State universities; the Atlanta History Center, and Atlanta Studies co-founder Varner, who is now at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The eight editorial board members represent a variety of specializations—historians, librarians, a geographer, and people with experience in community development—which helps guide the types of stories that need to be covered, Hatfield says.

    Representatives from the Auburn Avenue Research Library, Emory and Georgia State universities, and Atlanta Magazine comprise the 11-member advisory board. "These are senior scholars whose expertise and wisdom we can draw on as needed," Hatfield says. "They advise on focus and give their opinions about whether there are things we could do better or if there are stories that have been underreported in the press that we should focus on with their expertise."

    Hatfield says although Emory publishes the site, it's the cooperative nature of the project that makes it work.

    "There are so many colleges and universities throughout the Atlanta metro area that can contribute so much to the life of the region," Hatfield says. "Until now, there hasn't been a single space for people to come together and share research and ideas, and hopefully, collaborate on projects. The website, the symposiums and the meetups are creating that space and those forums where we might see a lot of productive exchange and take advantage of the remarkable research institutions that are located here."

    Posted on March 19, 2015
    by

    Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL)

    in

    Atlanta Intersections features Atlantans in conversation with Randy Gue, curator of Modern Political and Historical Collections at Emory University's Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL). In collaboration with Southern Spaces, MARBL presents clips of the full interviews to spur conversations and encourage research on the featured topics.

    Jesse Peel, MARBL Woodruff Room, Atlanta, Georgia, October 2012. Photograph by Bryan Meltz of Emory University Photo Video.

    Jesse Peel, MARBL Woodruff Room, Atlanta, Georgia, October 2012. Photograph by Bryan Meltz of Emory University Photo Video.

    Dr. Jesse Peel, psychiatrist and longtime AIDS and LGBT community activist, moved to Atlanta in 1976 where he opened a practice that served primarily gay men. In the early 1980s, many of Peel's clients and friends became sick and started dying from a mysterious new disease eventually named the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, commonly known as AIDS. Shocked and galvanized by the toll of the epidemic, Peel served on the board of directors of AID Atlanta and helped found Positive Impact, an organization dedicated to providing mental health programs for people with HIV and their friends, families, and caregivers.

    In this interview, Dr. Peel discusses his life as a gay man in Nashville, Tennessee, his move to Atlanta in the mid 1970s, and the geography of the LGBT community during the early years of the AIDS epidemic. In disarmingly charismatic fashion, Dr. Peel responds to questions about his life and accomplishments, often evoking audience laughter. In response to Rand Gue's query, "Why did you move to Atlanta?" Peel retorts, "When you start running into clients going into a gay bar as you're coming out, it's probably a good idea to shift to a larger venue."

     
    Randy Gue interviews Jesse R. Peel.

    This exchange presents Peel's conversational style of answering serious questions with humor. Peel's approach invites the audience to participate in thinking about difficult topics ranging from family disapproval of homosexuality, alienation from one's childhood community, fear of disease, to the loss of friends and loved ones.

    Peel also discusses Atlantans' multiple and contradictory responses to the emergent AIDS epidemic, as well as the efforts of health organizations that mobilized in its wake. Peel also talks about several political debates that shaped public discourse and the treatment of AIDS patients during the early years of the disease's history in Atlanta.

    In 2012, Peel donated his personal papers to Emory's Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL) to preserve and share his own experiences and stories of Atlanta's response to the AIDS epidemic with students, researchers, and the public. For more on Peel's contributions to the Atlanta LGBT community and AIDS advocacy efforts, see the Jesse R. Peel Papers.

    Posted on March 3, 2015
    by

    Steve Suitts, Atlanta, Georgia

    in

    The Southern Education Foundation's 2015 research bulletin reports that for the first time in over fifty years, a majority of schoolchildren attending the nation's public schools come from low-income families. "A New Majority" documents that in four out of every five states, low-income students comprised 40 percent or more of all public schoolchildren. In 2013, 50 percent or more of the public schoolchildren in twenty-one states were eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, a benefit available only to families living in poverty or near-poverty.

    The report further documents that most of the states with high rates of low-income students were in the South and West. Thirteen of the twenty-one states with a majority of low-income students were located in the South, and six others were in the West. Mississippi led the nation with the highest rate: ­71 percent, almost three out of every four public school children in Mississippi, were low-income. The nation's second highest rate was found in New Mexico, where 68 percent of all public school students were low-income.

    This defining moment in enrollment in US public education comes as a consequence of a steadily growing trend across several decades. In 1989, less than 32 percent of the nation's public school students were low-income. By 2000, the national rate had increased to over 38 percent.

    Percent of Low Income Students in U.S. Public Schools 2013. Map and Data courtesy of Steve Suitts and the Southern Education Foundation.
    Percent of Low Income Students in US Public Schools 2013. Map and Data courtesy of Steve Suitts and the Southern Education Foundation.

    The implications of this trend are far-reaching. It indicates persisting economic hardship for a large number of families with school-age children, signaling that children who usually have the largest educational needs often receive the least support, and are now a majority in the nation's public schools.

    The South and the nation are today a part of a new global economy that requires higher skills and knowledge from all who seek a decent living and a good life. People and policymakers must realize that their future and their grandchildren's future are inextricably bound to the success or failure of low-income students. This trend strongly suggests that little or nothing will change for the better if schools and communities continue to postpone addressing the primary question of education in America today: what does it take and what will be done to provide low-income students with a good chance to succeed in public schools? It is a question of how, not where, to improve the education of a new majority of students.

    The problems and needs of low-income students remain a matter of fairness, but they are also much more. The success or failure of these children in the public schools will determine the nation's future educational potential. Without improving educational support for low-income students—without effectively addressing the problems of poverty and low-income—the trend of the last few decades will be prologue for a nation not at risk, but in decline.

    About the Author

    Steve Suitts is senior fellow at the Southern Education Foundation.

    return to top

    Recommended Resources

    Text

    Suitts, Steve. "A New Majority Research Bulletin: Low Income Students Now a Majority in the Nation's Public Schools." Southern Education Foundation (2015). http://www.southerneducation.org/Our-Strategies/Research-and-Publications/New-Majority-Diverse-Majority-Report-Series/A-New-Majority-2015-Update-Low-Income-Students-Now.

    ———. "Update A New Majority: Low Income Students in the South and Nation." Southern Education Foundation (2013). http://www.southerneducation.org/News-and-Events/posts/April-2014/Juvenile-Justice-Education-Programs-in-the-United-aspx.aspx.

    ———. "A New Majority: Low Income Students in the South's Public Schools." Southern Education Foundation (2007). http://www.southerneducation.org/Our-Strategies/Research-and-Publications/New-Majority-Diverse-Majority-Report-Series/A-New-Majority-Low-Income-Students-in-the-South-s.aspx.

    Related Southern Spaces Publications

    Suitts, Steve. "Crisis of the New Majority: Low-Income Students in the South's Public Schools." Southern Spaces, April 16, 2008. http://southernspaces.org/2008/crisis-new-majority-low-income-students-souths-public-schools.

    ———. "The Worst of Times: Children in Extreme Poverty in the South and Nation." Southern Spaces, June 29, 2010. http://southernspaces.org/2010/worst-times-children-extreme-poverty-south-and-nation.

    return to top

    Posted on January 20, 2015
    by

    Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL), Emory University

    in

    Atlanta Intersections features Atlantans in conversation with Randy Gue, curator of Modern Political and Historical Collections at Emory University's Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL). In collaboration with Southern Spaces, MARBL presents clips of the full interviews to spur conversations and encourage research on the featured topics.

    In this interview, Susannah Darrow, executive director and co-founder of the arts magazine BURNAWAY, discusses the publication’s mission and its role in the Atlanta art scene. Darrow also explores recent collaborations between urban development projects, such as the Atlanta Beltline, and burgeoning art organizations, including Low Museum and Dashboard Co-op.

     
    Randy Gue interviews Susan Darrow of BURNAWAY magazine.

    About Susannah Darrow

    Susannah Darrow is the executive director and co-founder of BURNAWAY, a nonprofit organization that provides coverage and critical dialogue about the arts in and from Atlanta to champion and support vibrant creative communities across the Southeast.

    In 2014, Georgia Trend Magazine selected Darrow as one of Georgia's "40 Under 40." In 2013, the Georgia Center for Nonprofits included the native Atlantan among its "30 Under 30." Affiliated with the Arts Leaders of Metro Atlanta, Darrow serves on the board of directors for the Georgia Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts and as advisor to Atlanta Celebrates Photography. Darrow received a BA in Art History from the University of Georgia and an MA in Art History from Georgia State University.

    Posted on January 6, 2015
    by

    Ann Chinn, Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP)

    in

    There is no place where I can go, or where you can go, and think about, or summon the presence of, or recollect the absences of the ones that made the journey. There is no small bench by the road, there is not even a tree scored and initialized that I can visit, or you can visit, in Charleston, or Savannah, or New York, or Providence, or the Ohio River, or better still, on the banks of the Mississippi.

    Toni Morrison1

    Plaza de la Constitution, St. Plaza de la Constitution, St. Augustine, Florida, October 6, 2013. Participants placing carnations representing the 55 nations of Africa in a basket during the ceremony. Carnations were later placed in water to mark the arrival of captive people at the port. Photograph by William H. Hamilton, Jr. Courtesy of MPCPMP.
    Plaza de la Constitution, St. Augustine, Florida, October 6, 2013. Participants placing carnations representing the 55 nations of Africa in a basket during the ceremony. Carnations were later placed in water to mark the arrival of captive people at the port. Photograph by William H. Hamilton, Jr. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    The Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP) was established in 2011 to honor and commemorate the two million captive Africans who died during the Middle Passage and the half million enslaved who survived, arriving at forty-one documented sites in the United States. At these arrival ports a significant portion of American history began. Relying principally upon information from Voyages: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, developed by professors David Eltis of Emory University and David Richardson of the University of Hull, MPCPMP works with local residents and officials to conduct ancestral remembrance ceremonies and install historic markers related to Middle Passage history. This project's primary purpose is to provide a means of remembering and healing for the descendants of the enslaved and the nation.

    Sotterley Plantation, Hollywood, Maryland, November 12, 2012. Akan priest offering libation for ancestors. The people who arrived in this region were primarily imported by the Royal African Company based on the Gold Coast (Ghana). The plantation owner at Sotterley was an agent for the Company. Photograph by Kenneth Ford. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    Sotterley Plantation, Hollywood, Maryland, November 12, 2012. Akan priest offering libation for ancestors. The people who arrived in this region were primarily imported by the Royal African Company based on the Gold Coast (Ghana). The plantation owner at Sotterley was an agent for the Company. Photograph by Kenneth Ford. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    The remembrance ceremonies at these ports present the history of the transatlantic human trade and provide a means for addressing a painful and shameful American experience whose vestiges persist today. These ceremonies feature rituals incorporating representatives of African, Native American, Asian, and European religious traditions with current and historical ties to the site as well as a detailed recounting of the history of enslavement in the specific locale.

    The installation of historic markers at the forty-one Middle Passage arrival ports publicly designates these places as crucial points where the lives of European and African people intersected to form what would become the United States. In some cases, this has required a reassessment of the popular narrative and perceptions. For instance, Jamestown, Virginia, which is routinely identified in schoolbooks as the place where Africans first arrived in North America, is neither the actual place of Africans' first arrival in Virginia (Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is the actual site) or in North America (Florida holds that distinction). Residents of Fredericksburg, Virginia, long identified with the domestic human trade, recently learned, after MPCPMP presented Eltis's research from the Voyages Database, that their city was a Middle Passage port on the Rappahannock River.2

    Fells Point, Broadway Pier, Baltimore, Maryland, 2012 (The first ceremony sponsored by MPCPMP). Participants pouring libation to honor African ancestors who experienced the Middle Passage. Photograph by Zora Cobb. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    Fells Point, Broadway Pier, Baltimore, Maryland, 2012 (The first ceremony sponsored by MPCPMP). Participants pouring libation to honor African ancestors who experienced the Middle Passage. Photograph by Zora Cobb. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    With a proposed marker to be unveiled February 7, 2015, St. Augustine, Florida, previously known as a Spanish colony, will henceforth be identified as the oldest permanent (1565) European/African/Native American settlement on US territory. The inclusion of the forty–sixty free and enslaved Africans who arrived on Spanish ships at the first landing on August 28, 1565, significantly alters the narrative as the city embarks on commemorating its 450th anniversary. Boston is scheduled to hold a Middle Passage remembrance ceremony and to place a marker on August 23, 2015. The historical marker text will inform the general public about the Bay Colony's role as the first place where slavery was legal in the North American British colonies. This further reconfigures the popular perception that slavery was a phenomenon only of the US South. When a marker is installed in the Sapelo Bay area in Georgia, it will increase awareness that in 1526 the first European/African settlement, San Miguel de Gualdape, was established in this area. That marker will also record that Sapelo Bay is the site of the first rebellion by enslaved Africans and the first maroon community on the North American mainland.

    Documented middle passage sites in the continental United States, 2014. Map by Lynn Carlson.
    Documented middle passage sites in the continental United States (southerneastern and southwestern states, detail), 2014. Map by Lynn Carlson. Key: B = Ports where a marker has been placed and a ceremony has been held; M = Ports where a marker has been placed; C = Ports where a ceremony has been held; N = Ports with neither a marker nor a ceremony.
    Documented middle passage sites in the continental United States, 2014. Map by Lynn Carlson.
    Documented middle passage sites in the continental United States (mid-Atlantic and northeastern states, detail), 2014. Map by Lynn Carlson. Key: B = Ports where a marker has been placed and a ceremony has been held; M = Ports where a marker has been placed; C = Ports where a ceremony has been held; N = Ports with neither a marker nor a ceremony.

    Each MPCPMP ceremony and marker is unique. In our initial presentation to local participants in the commemoration project, we suggest elements to include in the remembrance ceremony and discuss the historical information on each marker, but otherwise act only as a facilitator and advisor. Each locale makes the decisions on the ceremony, program, marker design, and text. To date, nine sites have sponsored ceremonies in conjunction with the project since 2012:

    Three locations have installed markers: Historic Jamestowne, Virginia; Yorktown, Virginia; and Sotterley Plantation in Hollywood, Maryland. Eight locations are planning for ceremonies and/or marker installations: Boston (scheduled for August 23, 2015); Bristol, Rhode Island; Annapolis, Maryland (scheduled for February, 2015); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Galveston, Texas; Fredericksburg, Virginia (scheduled for 2015); St. Augustine, Florida (scheduled for February 7, 2015); and Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Two cities are reviewing historical evidence to determine if they will support the designation of Middle Passage arrival ports: Baltimore and Oxford, Maryland.

    Marker at Historic Jamestowne, Virginia, placed on August 23, 2013. Courtesy of MPCPMP.
    Marker at Historic Jamestowne, Virginia, placed on August 23, 2013. Courtesy of MPCPMP.

    Over the last twenty years local groups in several US cities have conducted African ancestral remembrance ceremonies marking Middle Passage sites.3 Some have affiliated into a loosely knit network independent of MPCPMP. As the only national organization working to commemorate Middle Passage sites, MPCPMP complements this work by ensuring that this history is systematically acknowledged and documented. As a member of the MPCPMP honorary board and creator of the database of the transatlantic slave trade, Eltis has been instrumental to this effort. Through information on the years, ships, numbers of captive Africans delivered, and embarkation and disembarkation locations obtained from Voyages, the project is able to present an appeal for ceremonies and markers at each arrival site based upon scholarly research. In a very real way, this is the direct and immediate application of scholarship to public history. MPCPMP works with local contacts to make a place where everyone "can go, to think about, or . . . summon the presence of, or recollect the absences of . . . the ones that made the journey."4

    For further information on MPCPMP visit middlepassageproject.org or the project's Facebook page.

    About the Author

    Ann Chinn is the Executive Director of the Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP).

     

    This is an open access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License.

    • 1. Toni Morrison, "A Bench by the Road," World Journal of the Unitarian Universalist Association 3 (January/February 1989): 4.
    • 2. Further study by a National Park Service historian reviewing data from the New York Historical Society provided more detail to support this "new" site definition.
    • 3. These cities include New York, New York, New Orleans, Louisiana, Hampton, Virginia, Oakland, California, Miami, Florida, Key West, Florida, and Galveston, Texas.
    • 4. Toni Morrison, "A Bench by the Road."
    1 comment.
    Posted on December 22, 2014
    by

    Mary E. Frederickson, Emory University

    in

    Series editor: Mary E. Frederickson, Emory University.
    Submission deadline:
    March 31, 2015.
    Questions: Contact managing editor Jesse P. Karlsberg.

    Harris and Ewing, Travelling syphilis laboratory, Washington, DC, 1937. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
    From Aiko Takeuchi-Demirci, "The Color of Democracy: A Japanese Public Health Official's Reconnaissance Trip to the US South."

    Southern Spaces, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes innovative scholarship on regions, places, and cultures of the US South and their global connections invites scholars, critics, writers, health care providers, public health practitioners, and patients to submit essays, photo essays, original documentaries, and digital projects for a forthcoming series titled Public Health and/in the US and Global South. Southern Spaces publications analyze and explore real and imagined places in the US South; make connections and comparisons between southern regions or locales and places in the wider world; and challenge conventional ways of understanding the people, places, and cultures found in and across the South.

    This 2015–2016 series will examine the relationship between public health and specific geographies—both real and imagined—in and across the US and global South. The journal welcomes projects relating to any time period or genre. Interdisciplinary frameworks, critical approaches to space and place, and work that foregrounds a transnational approach to public health are especially encouraged. Where possible, proposals should include media—sound, video, maps, images.

    Details from Toxic Release Mapping, Petrochemical America, page 150–151. Illustration by Kate Orff. Courtesy of author.
    From Gwen Ottinger, Ellen Griffith Spears, and Kate Orff, "Petrochemical America, Petrochemical Addiction."

    Possible topics include but are not limited to the following themes framed in relationship to the US and/or global South:

    • The relationship between health and migration,
    • Public health and its material culture(s)
    • Intersections of public health with place, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class
    • Campaigns for immunization, safe food, clean water, and disease eradication
    • Forms of healing (religious, spiritual, nutritional, and medicinal)
    • Historically Black Medical Schools
    • Disease specific analyses: sickle cell anemia, malaria, pellagra, hookworm, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, Ebola, HIV/AIDS
    • Disability studies
    • Local, state, and federal public health programs and institutions: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Public Health Service (PHS), Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA)
    • Drug testing, DNA analysis, and genetic screening programs
    • Prisoners and public health
    • Health insurance: Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and the Affordable Care Act
    • Public health and racial segregation
    • Labor and public health, corporate medical policies, work-related health issues
    • Rural poverty and well-being
    • Mental health
    • Food deserts and place-based food insecurity
    • Health-focused writing: fiction, memoir, and (auto)-biography
    • Domestic violence
    • Gun control and public health
    • Eugenics
    • Maternal and child morbidity and mortality

    In addition to essays, photo essays, and short videos, this series will feature peer-reviewed digital projects. Please contact the journal if you have any questions about the submission process or other aspects of digital project publishing. Southern Spaces editors are committed to assisting scholars at all levels of technological proficiency and support journal authors in selecting and producing multi-media materials to accompany their scholarship.

    From Christie Herring's Bodies and Souls.
    From Christie Herring, Bodies and Souls.

    While the journal will accept full essays during this initial call, the editorial staff encourages interested authors to submit proposals (350–700 words) at this stage. Selected proposal authors will be asked to submit a full essay for internal and eventual peer review. See the Southern Spaces submissions guidelines for style and formatting. All proposals should be submitted to seditor@emory.edu by March 31, 2015.

    The following pieces provide examples of the critical, interdisciplinary, and multimedia engagement with public health in the US and global South that this series seeks to expand: