An interdisciplinary journal about regions, places, and cultures of the US South and their global connections
Posted on December 20, 2012
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Alan G. Pike, Emory University

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The Bulletin compiles news from in and around the US South. We hope these posts will provide space for lively discussion and debate regarding issues of importance to those living in and intellectually engaging with the US South.

Posted on December 18, 2012
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Natasha Trethewey, Emory University

in
Jake Adam York during an interview with Natasha Trethewey, 2008.
Jake Adam York during an interview with Natasha Trethewey, 2008.

Jake Adam York served faithfully on the Southern Spaces editorial board. His insight, enthusiasm, and generosity will be missed.

Jake Adam York was a poet of great vision and a deeply humane intelligence. His work to chart the history of his native South and the civil rights movement—its violence and erasures—represents a brave reclamation and reckoning: a reclamation rooted in the absolute necessity to articulate, in the elegant language of poetry, a fuller version of our American story. Beyond the sheer beauty and technical skill of his poems is a profound intervention into our ongoing conversations about race and social justice. His body of work represents a bold and necessary challenge to our historical amnesia, making him one of our most indispensable American poets.

Related Southern Spaces Links

York, Jake Adam. "A Field Guide to Northern Alabama," March 7, 2008. http://www.southernspaces.org/2008/field-guide-northeast-alabama.

———. "In the Queen City: A Reading at the Gadsden Public Library," April 1, 2008. http://www.southernspaces.org/2008/queen-city-reading-gadsden-public-library.

———. "Anniversary," April 15, 2010. http://southernspaces.org/2010/anniversary.

———. "Medicine as Memory: Radcliffe Bailey at Atlanta's High Museum of Art," January 26, 2012. http://southernspaces.org/2012/medicine-memory-radcliffe-bailey-atlantas-high-museum-art.

Beasley, Sandra. "Jake Adam York Interviews Sandra Beasley," September 22, 2011. http://southernspaces.org/2011/jake-adam-york-interviews-sandra-beasley.

Trethewey, Natasha. "Jake Adam York Interviews Natasha Trethewey," June 15, 2010. http://southernspaces.org/2010/jake-adam-york-interviews-natasha-trethewey.

Books

 York, Jake Adam. The Architecture of Address: The Monument and Public Speech in American Poetry. New York: Routledge, 2004.

———. Murder Ballads. Denver, CO: Elixir Press, 2005.

———. A Murmuration of Starlings. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, 2008.

———. Persons Unknown. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, 2010.

Online Publications

Donovan, Gregory. "An Interview with Jake Adam York." Blackbird," 4, no. 1 (Spring 2005). http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v4n1/features/york_ja_100105/.

York, Jake Adam. "At Cornwall Furnace," "Breakfast," "Cannon," "Elegy for Little Girls," "In the Magic City," "Iron," "Janney," "Landscape in Dolomite and Ferric Oxide," "Looking for Cane Creek Furnace," "Midnight, Furnace, Wind," and "Interview with Featured Poet Jake Adam York." Town Creek Poetry 1, no. 1 (Spring 2007). http://www.towncreekpoetry.com/SPR07/toc.htm.

———. "Aubade," "Doppler," "What You Wish For," "Under," "Fell," "Heat," and "Regret/Egret." H_NGM_N no. 5. http://www.h-ngm-n.com/h_ngm_n-5/Jake-Adam-York.html.

———. "Bunk Richardson," "Consolation," "On Tallaseehatchee Creek," and "Vigil." Blackbird 3, no. 2 (Fall 2004). http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v3n2/poetry/york_ja/.

———. "The Crowd He Becomes." DIAGRAM 7, no. 2. http://thediagram.com/7_2/york.html.

———. "Diphthong," "Virga," and "Radiotherapy." Typo Magazine, no. 1. http://www.typomag.com/issue01/york.html.

———. "Elegy for James Knox." DIAGRAM 3, no. 2. http://thediagram.com/3_2/york.html.

———. "At Liberty," "Substantiation," "For Reverend James Reeb," and "For Lamar Smith." Blackbird 5, no. 2 (Fall 2006). http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v5n2/poetry/york_j/.

———. "Interferometry." Greensboro Review, no. 71 (Spring 2002). http://www.greensbororeview.org/spring-2002/interferometry.html.

———. Legba Says." Octopus Magazine, no. 1 (Summer 2003). http://www.octopusmagazine.com/issue01/Templates/jake_adam_york.html

———. "Panoramic: Landscape With Repeating Figures," "Double Exposure," and "Elegy for Little Girls." Terrain.org, no. 17 (Fall 2005). http://www.terrain.org/poetry/17/york.htm.

———. "Signal." DIAGRAM 2, no.3. http://thediagram.com/2_3/york.html.

———. "Still" and "Bye Bye Blackbird/Blackbird Bye Bye." Shampoo, no. 13 (August 2002). http://www.shampoopoetry.com/ShampooThirteen/york.html.

———. "Walt Whitman in Alabama," "Hush," "Negatives," and "York." Colorado Poets Center. http://www.coloradopoetscenter.org/poets/york_jake-adam/walt-whitman.html.

Links

Copper Nickel, University of Colorado, Denver, editor
http://www.copper-nickel.org/

Jake Adam York
http://www.jakeadamyork.com/

storySouth, founding editor
http://storysouth.com/

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Posted on December 13, 2012
by

Devin M. Brown, Emory University

in

This week's featured image was inspired by my own search for information about my newly adopted neighborhood of Cabbagetown, a former milltown on Atlanta's east side. With its perilous, narrow streets and shotgun houses—both hallmarks of milltown design—and with the Fulton Mill smokestacks looming mutely in the background, the neighborhood is saturated with remnants of its industrial past. But what did Cabbagetown look and feel like between the late nineteenth century and the late 1970s when the neighborhood's industrial identity was in its heyday?

Georgia Tech's Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills Digital Collection aims to show us a portion of this history. The collection, which is the result of a joint effort between the institute's Library and Information Center's Archives and Records Management, Digital Initiatives, and Systems Departments, provides digital access to archival images, community censuses, correspondence, and other records pertaining to the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills. Additionally, the collection highlights materials on "Labor organizing" and "Labor strikes," offering a wealth of archival print resources related to millworkers' struggles to organize in the early twentieth century.

After finding Cabbagetown using the collection's browse function, I discovered a number of striking images of my neighborhood, including an unattributed photograph from the early twentieth century depicting a store called Red J. on Carroll Street. Although it's difficult to determine the exact location of the shop from the contextual information contained within the image it's safe to say that it was very close to the factory's eastern side.

Red J. Store on Carroll Street, ca. 1910–1920. Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills Digital Collection, Georgia Institute of Technology, vam004-015.
Red J. Store on Carroll Street, ca. 1910–1920. Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills Digital Collection, Georgia Institute of Technology, vam004-015.

Given the amount and types of resources this digital collection makes available to the public, I suspect I'll be referencing it more frequently as I work to uncover for myself Cabbagetown's rich and complicated past.

Posted on November 29, 2012
by

Alan G. Pike, Emory University

in

The Bulletin compiles news from in and around the US South. We hope these posts will provide space for lively discussion and debate regarding issues of importance to those living in and intellectually engaging with the US South.

After over a decade of research and surveying, North Carolina and South Carolina have reached an agreement on the official 335-mile border line between the two states. As noted by AP reporter Jeffrey Collins, the roots of the disputed border line go back to a 1735 order from King George II to draw a boundary between North and South Carolina. His instructions were to draw a line which began thirty miles south of the Cape Fear River and extended northwest to thirty-five degrees latitude; the border would then be drawn due west until it reached the Pacific Ocean. The original boundary was marked by hatchet marks on trees, strategically placed rocks, and other natural markers which have long since disappeared. Kim Severson of The New York Times reported that the two states formed a joint boundary commission in the mid-1990s after a border dispute arose when South Carolina bought some land near the border from the North Carolina-based power company Duke Energy. Since the 1990s, geographers, historians, and surveyors have used global positioning technology to draw a more precise border between the two Carolinas. The newly agreed upon border will result in ninety-three properties changing from one state to the other, as reported by Nick Carbone of Time magazine's Newsfeed Blog.

The border between North Carolina and South Carolina has been redrawn numerous times over the course of British colonial and United States history. The map below illustrates the colony of Carolina in the year 1715, before it was divided by the British crown in the wake of disputes over governance.

Johann Homann, "Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannorum industria excultae . . .," 1715. Via Wikimedia Commons.
Johann Homann, "Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannorum industria excultae . . .," 1715. Via Wikimedia Commons.

This next map illustrates the border between the colonies of North Carolina and South Carolina in 1746, which had been extended to the Appalachian Mountains, seventeen years after the colony of Carolina was officially split in two in 1729. When this map was drawn, Charles Town was located in the colony of North Carolina.

Herman Moll, "Map of Carolina," 1746. Via Wikimedia Commons.
Herman Moll, "Map of Carolina," 1746. Via Wikimedia Commons.

This map of the state of South Carolina in 1779 illustrates the border which was drawn between the colonies of North Carolina and South Carolina in 1772—the same border that present-day researchers sought to recreate aided by GPS technology. The border between the two states was drawn significantly farther to the north (beginning on the coast at Cape Fear) than the colonial border of 1746 represented above in which North Carolina's southern border followed the Savannah River.

J. Hinton, "A New and Accurate Map of the Province of South Carolina in North America," 1779. From The Universal Magazine, courtesy of the Historical Maps of Alabama Collection, University of Alabama Department of Geography. Via Wikimedia Commons.
J. Hinton, "A New and Accurate Map of the Province of South Carolina in North America," 1779. From The Universal Magazine, courtesy of the Historical Maps of Alabama Collection, University of Alabama Department of Geography. Via Wikimedia Commons.

This 1818 map shows the states of North Carolina and South Carolina, with new western borders, prior to the Civil War. South Carolina's northwestern border in 1818 encompassed terrain formerly identified as "Cherokees Country" in the map from 1779.

John Pinkerton, "United States of America Southern Part," 1818. From Pinkerton, J., A Modern Atlas, from the Latest and Best Authorities, Exhibiting the Various Divisions of the World with its chief Empires, Kingdoms, and States; in Sixty Maps, carefully reduced from the Larges and Most Authentic Sources. 1818, Philadelphia, Thomas Dobson Edition. Via Wikimedia Commons.
John Pinkerton, "United States of America Southern Part," 1818. From Pinkerton, J., A Modern Atlas, from the Latest and Best Authorities, Exhibiting the Various Divisions of the World with its chief Empires, Kingdoms, and States; in Sixty Maps, carefully reduced from the Larges and Most Authentic Sources (Philadelphia: Thomas Dobson Edition, 1818). Via Wikimedia Commons.

This 1855 map of North Carolina illustrates the border between the two states immediately prior to the Civil War. The border between South Carolina and Georgia dipped farther south to the Savannah River than in 1818, and the western borders of both states are more clearly defined in this later map.

Joseph Hutchins Colton, "North Carolina," 1855. From Colton, G. W., Colton's Atlas of the World Illustrating Physical and Political Geography, vol. 1 (New York, 1855). Via Wikimedia Commons.
Joseph Hutchins Colton, "North Carolina," 1855. From Colton, G. W., Colton's Atlas of the World Illustrating Physical and Political Geography, vol. 1 (New York, 1855). Via Wikimedia Commons.
Posted on November 20, 2012
by

Devin M. Brown, Emory University

in

In April 2012, Southern Spaces published an interview with Lance Ledbetter, founder of Dust-to-Digital Records, in which he discussed the operations of his Atlanta-based record label. During the interview, Ledbetter mentioned a new project which would create a digital repository of historical sound recordings—accompanied by discographical information, music notation, lyrics, and biographical information about artists and composers—to make available the tens of thousands of recordings without commercial potential.

Music Memory, launched by Lance Ledbetter.

The frontpage of Music Memory, an online music archive launched by Lance Ledbetter.

This month, Ledbetter has launched Music Memory, his audio-centered spin on the concept of scholarly databases. The site will focus upon recordings made during the "Golden Age of roots music" (1925–1950), and the recordings will be digitized primarily from 78 RPM records that have been amassed and preserved by a group of dedicated collectors partnering with Ledbetter. Although the music that eventually will populate Music Memory is not yet accessible to users, the site provides a first glimpse at Music Memory's layout and design.

Posted on November 15, 2012
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Alan G. Pike and Jesse P. Karlsberg, Emory University

in

The Bulletin compiles news from in and around the US South. We hope these posts will provide space for lively discussion and debate regarding issues of importance to those living in and intellectually engaging with the US South.

  • The 2012 United States presidential election results have led mapmakers and illustrators over the past week to search for new ways to visualize the geography of political power. Mark Newman, Paul Dirac Collegiate Professor of Physics at the University of Michigan, released a series of maps and cartograms depicting the state- and county-level results of the presidential election between Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Barack Obama scaled by population density. Illustrator Chris Howard designed another map which overlays county-by-county election results with population density data as recorded in the 2010 census. This image, which depicts the electoral power of densely populated areas without distorting the shapes of the counties, provoked analysis, as in this piece by Sommer Mathis writing in The Atlantic Cities, about the importance of cities in deciding the election. Metropolitan areas in the US South and elsewhere in the interior appear on the map as dense blue dots surrounded by rings of pink. The map illustrates how elections are decided on an urban/suburban basis, as Lydia DePillis argued in The New Republic. This distribution of political power is a consequence of the demographic shifts in cities like Atlanta since the Second World War, a topic discussed by Kevin Kruse in his 2005 Southern Spaces presentation "White Flight: The Strategies, Ideology, and Legacy of Segregationists in Atlanta."
  • Post-election conversation has also focused on the continued dominance of the Republican Party in the US South. In The New York Times, Campbell Robertson argued that the Republican coalition that has been characterized as a shrinking proportion of the population across much of the country remains dominant in a number of southern states. Remarking on the similar results of the 2008 presidential election in his Southern Spaces piece "The US South and the 2008 Election," Joseph Crespino tied rhetoric about Republican political dominance in the US South to the rise of the Sun Belt and noted that populations in several southern states voted in favor of Obama. Crespino's analysis remains a useful reminder that the US South is a heterogenous section of the country.